Blogs

How IIoT and SCADA Systems are Melding Together

Dr Yair Poleg, PhD,  Chief Technology Officer (CTO)
Ayyeka

For more than 50 years, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems have been at the forefront of monitoring industrial infrastructure through computerized means. Comprising a collection of cyber-secure, industrial-grade hardware and software to collect, analyze, and control information from sensors, SCADA systems are deployed around the world to monitor and control complex, fast-moving industrial processes that exceed humans’ abilities for manual oversight. SCADA applications include providing monitoring and control capabilities in power generation plants, HVAC systems, and large-scale manufacturing processes such as automated production lines.  Continue reading

Is BIM a Market into Which GIS Can Expand?

Christine Easterfield, Principal Consultant
Cambashi 

The current worldwide market for GIS (geographic information system) is estimated to be around $3 billion. According to the scope of our research and in the traditional markets of government, public services and utilities, spending on GIS is expected to grow to just under $4 billion by 2020. But in an increasingly spatially aware world, are there opportunities for growth elsewhere? Continue reading

Share Remote Data, Not the Network

Bob McIlvride, Director, Communications
Skkynet Cloud Systems, Inc.

The Industrial IoT (IIoT) is promising to dramatically change the landscape of industrial process control. Managers and executives worldwide are waking up to the value of the data in their production systems, and are demanding access to it to boost efficiency and cut costs. Engineers responsible for devices and equipment at remote locations can use the IIoT to provide this data to users wherever they may need it. However, the question often arises: How to share the data securely? Continue reading

Using SCADA Data for IIoT Just Became Much Easier

Bert Baeck, CEO, TrendMiner

At times it seems hard to believe we’re already in the second decade of the 21st century; what is even harder to believe is that the majority of manufacturers are still only using technology that is at least 30 years old.  Many of these systems work wonderfully for what they are meant to do, collect and store data and monitor systems. However, these systems alone cannot help industrial companies meet the challenges of today’s global market. Continue reading

Smart Energy: What is the Risk?

Morgan Meier, Technical Support Specialist
Plixer International

Smart energy is a cost-effective and sustainable energy system in which renewable energy production, infrastructures, and consumption are integrated and coordinated through energy services, active users, and enabling technologies. Many energy companies are moving over to smart meters, which allow service providers to remotely monitor the consumer’s consumption, connect, and even disconnect power. Continue reading

CAN Versus Ethernet: Advantages, Disadvantages and Alternatives for Industrial Automation

Kent Lennartsson, Research Manager
Kvaser AB

In industrial automation settings, like manufacturing plants and assembly lines, computing systems are used to replace the need for human involvement in the decision-making process. For example, rather than having operators at a cola plant use a machine to fill soda bottles with the CO2 levels needed for correct carbonation, the machine itself can be programmed to complete this task. While some lament the limited human involvement, there are several advantages to this method of manufacturing, including: Continue reading

Security Analytics and Visualizations that Could Prevent a Ukraine-like Power Outage

Richard Jones, VP Grid Security – Bridge Energy Group
Shawn Fountain, Principal Consultant – Bridge Energy Group 

Most readers by now have probably heard about the early January announcement of malware found in a Vermont Utility.  To those familiar with the cyberattack induced power outages in the Ukraine in December 2015 that cut power to nearly 230,000 customers for several hours, this was not a surprise.[1] While the Ukraine event is the only publicized power outage from a cyberattack, there have been other successful cyberattacks to SCADA and industrial control systems risking our critical infrastructure that represent a clear warning signal for utility organizations.

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